Majors in the Music Program

Students will select one of 3 majors offered in the Program.

Music Performance (27 credits – 54 ECTS)

An individual instruction in the study and interpretation of musical literature. Repertoire includes, etudes, scales, arpeggios, sonatas by Scarlatti, Bach’s Preludes and Fugues, Sonatas by Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven, Piano pieces by Mendelssohn, Schumann, Chopin, Brahms and Liszt, contemporary piano music by Debussy, Bartók, Ligeti, works by American and Greek composers. Student has to prepare two concert recitals. Prerequisites: Entrance audition required. Credits: 24 (3 per semester)
This one-to-one course is offered to piano majors that have completed the sophomore year of their studies, giving them the opportunity of specialization in the Art of Vocal Accompaniment. Articulated in four distinct areas comprising both Art Song and Aria repertoire, the course provides to pianists the diverse stylistic knowledge and practical skills to address vocal repertoire from Baroque to the 21st century. In each semester students will explore one of the following genres: the German Lied, French Mélodie, World Art Song (repertoire not restricted to but focused on Greek and American composers) and the operatic Aria. The course considers issues of diction in the main languages of vocal repertoire and the various performance traditions as well. Student has to prepare two public performances as an accompanist of vocal recitals. Prerequisite(s): Entrance audition required, MU401.1-401.4 Credits: 12 (3 per semester)
An individual instruction in the study and interpretation of musical literature. Repertoire includes etudes, scales, arpeggios, concertos and sonatas by Tartini, Handel, Bach, Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven. Romantic compositions by Schumann, Brahms, Franck, Faure. Also includes works by modern composers such as Ysaÿe, Bartok, Debussy, Ravel and studies of the orchestral repertoire. Prerequisites: Entrance audition required. Credits: 24 (3 per semester)
An individual instruction in the study and interpretation of musical literature. Repertoire includes etudes, scales, arpeggios, concertos and sonatas by Telemann, Handel, Bach, Stamitz, Hoffmeister, Mozart. The viola sonatas by Brahms, Shostakovich and Hindemith, and the viola concertos by Walton and Bartók. Special focus on the study of orchestral excerpts. Prerequisites: Entrance audition required. Credits: 24 (3 per semester)
An individual instruction in the study and interpretation of musical literature. Repertoire studied includes sonatas by Bach, Vivaldi, Beethoven, Brahms, Faure, Grieg, Rachmaninov, Debussy; concertos by Boccherini, Haydn, Schumann, Saint-Saens, Dvořak and Elgar. Special attention will be given on the study of basso continuo and, scales, arpeggios, etudes and excerpts of the orchestral repertoire. Prerequisites: Entrance audition required. Credits: 24 (3 per semester)
An individual instruction in the study and interpretation of musical literature. Repertoire includes, scales, arpeggios, etudes, sonatas by Vivaldi, Hindemith, Vasks, Gubaidulina; concertos by Dittersdorf, Krebs, Hoffmeister, Bottesini. Techniques for the tone, bow, pizzicato, thumb positions, vibrato, fingerings. Special focus on the study of orchestra excerpts. Prerequisites: Entrance audition required. Credits: 24 (3 per semester)
An individual instruction in the study and interpretation of musical literature. Repertoire includes etudes, scales, arpeggios, concertos and sonatas by Foscarini, Bartolotti, Corbetta, Sanz, Weiss. Romantic compositions by Aguado, Albeniz, Arcas, Carulli, Coste, Tarrega, Barrios. Also includes works by modern composers such as Brower, Granados, Lauro, Villa-Lobos. Prerequisites: Entrance audition required. Credits: 24 (3 per semester)
An individual instruction in the study and interpretation of musical literature. Topics include the correct posture, basic elements of breathing, the vibrato, articulation, developing a practice and warm up routine. Repertoire includes baroque arias, arias from baroque oratorios and passions, lieder by Mozart Beethoven, Schubert, Schumann, Brahms, Wolf, arias from operas by Mozart, Rossini, Verdi, Puccini, Weber, Wagner, Berlioz, Bizet, Gounod, Tchaikovsky; songs written by composers of the 20th century. Prerequisites: Entrance audition required. Credits: 24 (3 per semester)
Study fundamental concepts and techniques of sound production, practice methods, instrument selection, tuning, maintenance, rhythm, sight-reading, aural skills, musical styles and interpretation. Study of seven instrument categories including snare drum, drumset, hand drumming, percussion keyboards, timpani, orchestral accessories, and multiple percussion, in one hour per week private lessons for each semester. Emphasis of solo and chamber music literature and performance including the senior recital. Prerequisites: Entrance audition required. Credits: 24 (3 per semester)
An individual instruction in the study and interpretation of musical literature. Saxophone lessons will consist of an overall knowledge of the saxophone in either jazz or classical disciplines. The Student through the preparation of weekly assigned material will display a command of the instrument and skills necessary to succeed in a variety of musical situations. Prerequisites: Entrance audition required. Credits: 24 (3 per semester)
Introduces techniques for Conducting. Conducting patterns applied to elements of interpretation. Practice in sight singing. Further development of score reading and conducting technique. Basic skills—beat patterns, use of each hand, study of musical terminology, transposition, tempi, and dynamics; simple score reading and conducting experience with emphasis on instrumental techniques. Observation and discussion of rehearsal procedure, band and orche

Course requirements: (Select one of the following)

{slider=MU470 Chamber Music}Rehearsal and performance of chamber music. Specified chamber music experience in classes for trios and quartets for students concentrating in instrumental performance. Prerequisites: None. Credits: 3

Involves acting, musical coaching, movement, stage, and audition techniques will culminate in the performance of opera scenes and possible ensemble participation in a main stage production. Fundamental stage techniques. Basic stage language, movement, presentation skills, and fundamentals of acting for recital and opera. Training in the awareness of the dramatic aspects of music as basis for characterization and includes an introduction to scene work. Prerequisites: None. Credits: 3
Introduces practices of conducting through a detailed study of the problems of baton technique. These skills applied to selected excerpts from the standard literature, including concertos, recitatives, and contemporary music. Fundamentals of score reading and baton technique discussed. Provides an introduction to the art, the craft, and the practice of orchestral conducting. The course is targeted to students in Music Composition, and the experienced musician who is familiar with the basic orchestral repertoire as well as the fundamental procedures of orchestral playing. Prerequisites: None. Credits: 3

Music Theory and Composition (30 credits – 60 ECTS)

 Studies music from 1910 to the present; new compositional and analytical procedures. In particular, the course encompasses the following materials: A study of impressionistic techniques; pandiatonic and mirror harmony; polychoral, polytonal and atonal writing; and numerous creative exercises in the styles of the most significant composers of all nationalities of the 20th Century. The art and literature of the period of the specific composers under consideration will be discussed in conjunction with the stylistic analysis of the music. Prerequisites: MU203. Credits: 3
Analytical techniques for the study of tonal music of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. This course focuses on the tonal language of nineteenth-century European composers, including Schubert, Chopin, Brahms, and Wagner. Students confront analytical problems posed by their increasing uses of chromaticism and extended forms through both traditional (classical) models of tonal harmony and form, as well as alternative approaches specifically tailored to this repertory. Students present model compositions and write analytical papers. Prerequisites: GE105, GE106, GE115, MU101, MU102, MU201, MU202, MU203. Credits: 3
Introduces practices of conducting through a detailed study of the problems of baton technique. These skills applied to selected excerpts from the standard literature, including concertos, recitatives, and contemporary music. Fundamentals of score reading and baton technique discussed. Provides an introduction to the art, the craft, and the practice of orchestral conducting. The course is targeted to students in Music Composition, and the experienced musician who is familiar with the basic orchestral repertoire as well as the fundamental procedures of orchestral playing. Prerequisites: MU101. Credits: 3
Develops contrapuntal skills and techniques in two-, three-, and four-part textures. Analysis and writing of examples of sixteenth-century vocal styles including the motet. Study of eighteenth-century instrumental styles including invertible counterpoint, chorale prelude, and two-and three-part inventions. Prerequisites: MU203. Credits: 3
Teaches the use of personal computers to apply the basics of a Musical Instrument Digital Interface system, its software, and the instruments commonly used with desktop MIDI workstations (synthesizers, digital samplers). MIDI sequencing, digital audio editing, and principles of digital syntheses. The course is intended for those with little prior technical training. An introduction to the computer music studio, techniques of digital recording and editing, analog and FM synthesis, MIDI sequencing, and a comprehensive study of the literature and styles of the classic tape studios. Study of advanced synthesis techniques, digital sampling, video synchronization, and multimedia applications. Compositional projects in electronic music. Prerequisites: None. Co-requisites: IT100. Credits: 3
Introduces practices of conducting through a detailed study of the problems of baton technique. These skills applied to selected excerpts from the standard literature, including concertos, recitatives, and contemporary music. Fundamentals of score reading and baton technique discussed. Provides an introduction to the art, the craft, and the practice of orchestral conducting. The course is targeted to students in Music Composition, and the experienced musician who is familiar with the basic orchestral repertoire as well as the fundamental procedures of orchestral playing. Prerequisites: Entrance audition required. Credits: 2
Builds on MU 461, and introduces students to some of the basic problems in musical composition through a series of exercises. Written work modelled on analyses of representative forms. Topics include: composition of music sentences and periods, composition in several idioms such as pandiatonic, atonal, twelve-tone, serial, pointilistic; analysis of representative compositions written in the 20th century; setting lyrics to music; Original compositions for different music ensembles; Contemporary instrumental techniques. Prerequisites: MU461. Credits: 2
Builds on MU 462, and introduces students to some of the basic problems in musical composition through a series of exercises. Written work modelled on analyses of representative forms. Topics include: composition of music sentences and periods, composition in several idioms such as pandiatonic, atonal, twelve-tone, serial, pointilistic; analysis of representative compositions written in the 20th century; setting lyrics to music; Original compositions for different music ensembles; Contemporary instrumental techniques. Prerequisites: MU462. Credits: 2
 Builds on MU 463, and introduces students to some problems in musical composition through a series of exercises. Written work modelled on analyses of representative forms. Written work modelled on analyses of representative forms. Topics include: composition of music sentences and periods, composition in several idioms such as pandiatonic, atonal, twelve-tone, serial, pointilistic; analysis of representative compositions written in the 20th century; setting lyrics to music; Original compositions for different music ensembles; Contemporary instrumental techniques. Prerequisites: MU463. Credits: 2
Builds on MU 464, and introduces students to some problems in musical composition through a series of e exercises. Written work modelled on analyses of representative forms. Topics include: composition of music sentences and periods, composition in several idioms such as pandiatonic, atonal, twelve-tone, serial, pointilistic; analysis of representative compositions written in the 20th century; setting lyrics to music; Original compositions for different music ensembles; Contemporary instrumental techniques. Prerequisites: MU464. Credits: 2
Builds on MU 465, and introduces students to some problems in musical composition through a series of exercises. Written work modelled on analyses of representative forms. Topics include: composition of music sentences and periods, composition in several idioms such as pandiatonic, atonal, twelve-tone, serial, pointilistic; analysis of representative compositions written in the 20th century; setting lyrics to music; Original compositions for different music ensembles; Contemporary instrumental techniques. Prerequisites: MU465. Credits: 2
Builds on MU 462, and introduces students to some problems in musical composition through a series of exercises. Written work modelled on analyses of representative forms. Topics include: composition of music sentences and periods, composition in several idioms such as pandiatonic, atonal, twelve-tone, serial, pointilistic; analysis of representative compositions written in the 20th century; setting lyrics to music; Original compositions for different music ensembles; Contemporary instrumental techniques. Prerequisites: MU466. Credits: 3

Music History and Literature (10 courses / 30 credits – 60 ECTS)

Violin for Beginners is designed for the student who has not a musical background and would like to learn the fundamentals of violin playing or the student whose major performing area is the piano. The course stresses basic string techniques and provides an introduction to violin performance. (This course serves to substitute for MU 151 Piano Studio I, MU152 Piano Studio II & MU153 Piano Studio III for students concentrating in Piano or with efficiency in Piano as qualifying after audition with Music Faculty). Prerequisites: None. Co-requisite for non-music majors: MU101. Credits: 3
Examines chromatic and enharmonic harmonic practises thoroughly. The course is structured for students with a prior understanding of harmony and who are interested in expanding their knowledge, and examining music form the late romantic and early 20th century music. Continuation of MU201. Prerequisites: MU101, MU102, MU201. Credits: 3
Surveys music chronologically from the Middle Ages to the present. Topics include chant and secular song in the middle ages, polyphonic music from its beginning through the thirteenth century, Ars nova, Renaissance music of the low countries, the music of reformation, music of the early baroque, Bach, Vivaldi, Handel, Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Romanticism, and Opera from the early 20th century. (This course serves to substitute for MU222 Music History II, for students concentrating in modern music). Prerequisite(s): None; For non-music majors: GE142 Credits: 3
Studies the most important fields of Greek Music from Classical Antiquity and Byzantine era to today’s traditional, classical and pop music. Topics include: Ancient Greek music, Music of the Hellenistic period, Music of the Byzantine Empire, Music during the Ottoman Empire, Greek folk music of the mainland, Crete and the islands, Urban songs (Rembetika), Greek Classical Music from the Ionian islands, the Greek National School of Music, contemporary classical music, pop, rock and other current streams. (This course serves to substitute for MU321 Music History III, for students concentrating in modern music). Prerequisite(s): None; For non-music majors: GE142
Studies important issues connected with America's music: the art of improvisation; the role of composition; innovation and tradition; individuality and style; instruments and forms. Examination of the formation of the roots of American music, issues of race. Students will learn how to appreciate Native American, Delta blues, country, New Orleans jazz, New York swing and bepop, Classical American music and pop if they are unfamiliar with it, and to deepen their understanding. (This course serves to substitute for MU322 Music History IV, for students concentrating in modern music). Prerequisite(s): None; For non-music majors: GE142. Credits: 3
Studies the music and musical cultures from around the world. Musical traditions throughout the world are considered through analytical, social, and aesthetic approaches. Introduction to the music and contexts of South America, Africa, India, Japan, and Indonesia. Topics include popular and folk music, music and ritual, communication, and self-expression, with consideration of modal structures, instruments, forms, and performance practices. Discussion of issues such as orientalism (i.e., Western representations of the Orient) and the need to develop cultural identities in once-colonized countries. (This course fulfils the Interdisciplinary and Intercultural category). Prerequisite(s): None; For non-music majors: GE142. Credits: 3
Examines different approaches to word-music relationships in a broad range of periods and genres. Combining text (whether sung or implied) and music adds another layer to both elements reinforcing meaning and feeling. Students will explore some of these rich interactions in such diverse and chronologically disparate genres as the troubadour song, the Renaissance erotic madrigal, the German Lied, the program symphony, as well as modern combinations of words and music. We will consider how the elements of the text (syntax, rhyme, form, alliterations, etc.) dictate particular musical decisions, but also how the music underlines, attenuates, or even subverts the meaning of the words. Concepts to investigate include irony, musical rhetoric, intertextuality, and, even, “silence.” Prerequisite(s): None; For non-music majors: GE142 Credits: 3
Develops contrapuntal skills and techniques in two-, three-, and four-part textures. Analysis and writing of examples of sixteenth-century vocal styles including the motet. Study of eighteenth-century instrumental styles including invertible counterpoint, chorale prelude, and two-and three-part inventions. Prerequisites: MU203. Credits: 3
Teaches the use of personal computers to apply the basics of a Musical Instrument Digital Interface system, its software, and the instruments commonly used with desktop MIDI workstations (synthesizers, digital samplers). MIDI sequencing, digital audio editing, and principles of digital syntheses. The course is intended for those with little prior technical training. An introduction to the computer music studio, techniques of digital recording and editing, analog and FM synthesis, MIDI sequencing, and a comprehensive study of the literature and styles of the classic tape studios. Study of advanced synthesis techniques, digital sampling, video synchronization, and multimedia applications. Compositional projects in electronic music. Prerequisites: None. Co-requisites: IT100. Credits: 3
Pending This course provides the tools for scholarly research for music history and literature students. It will offer an overview of the elements involved in conducting research in various fields of music, including music performance, music history, and music education. Print and electronic formats will be explored to find appropriate music research materials. In addition, this course focuses on the critical elements necessary to successfully accomplish advanced research in all areas of music scholarship. Prerequisite(s): Completion of all music program requirements Credits: 3

Music Electives – (9-12 credits – 18-24 ECTS)

Violin for Beginners is designed for the student who has not a musical background and would like to learn the fundamentals of violin playing or the student whose major performing area is the piano. The course stresses basic string techniques and provides an introduction to violin performance. (This course serves to substitute for MU 151 Piano Studio I, MU152 Piano Studio II & MU153 Piano Studio III for students concentrating in Piano or with efficiency in Piano as qualifying after audition with Music Faculty). Prerequisites: None. Co-requisite for non-music majors: MU101. Credits: 3
Designed for beginning voice students without previous knowledge, and those who would like to work on the basic skills of singing, including vocal technique (in speech and singing) and solo vocal performance. Aspects of breathing, support, diction and a variety of vocal literature will be addressed. Co-requisite for non-music majors: MU101 Credits: 3
Designed for the student who would like to acquire the fundamental skills for playing the guitar. The course stresses basic guitar playing techniques and provides an introduction to guitar performance. Co-requisite for non-music majors: MU101 Credits: 3
Addresses jazz improvisation, the art of manipulating the elements of jazz music in real-time, through guided performance practices. Students will develop improvisational skills, through piano performance. (This course serves to substitute for MU154 Piano Studio IV, MU155 Piano Studio V and MU156 Piano Studio VI, for students concentrating in modern music). Prerequisite(s): MU153 Credits: 3 (1 per three semesters)
Examines chromatic and enharmonic harmonic practises thoroughly. The course is structured for students with a prior understanding of harmony and who are interested in expanding their knowledge, and examining music form the late romantic and early 20th century music. Continuation of MU201. Prerequisites: MU101, MU102, MU201. Credits: 3
The study of basic concepts of jazz melody, harmony, rhythm and form. Includes the study of jazz notation, chord progressions, chord voicing, chord relationships, voice- leading, jazz harmonization, chord-scale relationships, improvisational devices, and song forms. (This course serves to substitute for MU202 Music Theory IV, for students concentrating in modern music). Prerequisites: MU201. Credits: 3
Surveys music chronologically from the Middle Ages to the present. Topics include chant and secular song in the middle ages, polyphonic music from its beginning through the thirteenth century, Ars nova, Renaissance music of the low countries, the music of reformation, music of the early baroque, Bach, Vivaldi, Handel, Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Romanticism, and Opera from the early 20th century. (This course serves to substitute for MU222 Music History II, for students concentrating in modern music). Prerequisite(s): None; For non-music majors: GE142 Credits: 3
Studies ranges, tonal possibilities, technical limitations, and necessary transpositions for all orchestral and band instruments, including writing for combinations of instruments. Prerequisite(s): MU101. Credits: 3
Applies practical orchestration methodologies, and addresses a variety of orchestration applications for different settings and environments. Prerequisites: MU303. Credits: 3
An investigation of historical, philosophical, aesthetic, and pedagogical principles that provide the background and context for contemporary music education. The course focuses on developing a vision of music education for the future. It is designed to provide students an overview of the cultural and historical context of music education. This foundation will provide the necessary perspective for a practical application of philosophical and aesthetic principles. Prerequisites: GE106. Credits: 3
Studies the most important fields of Greek Music from Classical Antiquity and Byzantine era to today’s traditional, classical and pop music. Topics include: Ancient Greek music, Music of the Hellenistic period, Music of the Byzantine Empire, Music during the Ottoman Empire, Greek folk music of the mainland, Crete and the islands, Urban songs (Rembetika), Greek Classical Music from the Ionian islands, the Greek National School of Music, contemporary classical music, pop, rock and other current streams. (This course serves to substitute for MU321 Music History III, for students concentrating in modern music). Prerequisite(s): None; For non-music majors: GE142
Studies important issues connected with America's music: the art of improvisation; the role of composition; innovation and tradition; individuality and style; instruments and forms. Examination of the formation of the roots of American music, issues of race. Students will learn how to appreciate Native American, Delta blues, country, New Orleans jazz, New York swing and bepop, Classical American music and pop if they are unfamiliar with it, and to deepen their understanding. (This course serves to substitute for MU322 Music History IV, for students concentrating in modern music). Prerequisite(s): None; For non-music majors: GE142. Credits: 3
Studies the music and musical cultures from around the world. Musical traditions throughout the world are considered through analytical, social, and aesthetic approaches. Introduction to the music and contexts of South America, Africa, India, Japan, and Indonesia. Topics include popular and folk music, music and ritual, communication, and self-expression, with consideration of modal structures, instruments, forms, and performance practices. Discussion of issues such as orientalism (i.e., Western representations of the Orient) and the need to develop cultural identities in once-colonized countries. (This course fulfils the Interdisciplinary and Intercultural category). Prerequisite(s): None; For non-music majors: GE142. Credits: 3
Examines different approaches to word-music relationships in a broad range of periods and genres. Combining text (whether sung or implied) and music adds another layer to both elements reinforcing meaning and feeling. Students will explore some of these rich interactions in such diverse and chronologically disparate genres as the troubadour song, the Renaissance erotic madrigal, the German Lied, the program symphony, as well as modern combinations of words and music. We will consider how the elements of the text (syntax, rhyme, form, alliterations, etc.) dictate particular musical decisions, but also how the music underlines, attenuates, or even subverts the meaning of the words. Concepts to investigate include irony, musical rhetoric, intertextuality, and, even, “silence.” Prerequisite(s): None; For non-music majors: GE142 Credits: 3
Concentrates on the writing different types of fugues and on short pieces involving different types of imitation. The material is based on Bach's The Well-Tempered Clavier, Goldberg Variations, Das Musikalische Opfer, and Die Kunst der Fuge. Prerequisites: MU203, MU407. Credits: 3
Examines aesthetic, technical, and conceptual issues of works that combine music and video, focusing on the critical interactions between visual elements and music, and their processes of perception. It explores several current technological research and innovative approaches and techniques to works for music and video. This course will also provide historical and critical overview of the artists and scientists whose technical innovations have made a significant impact on the development of audio-visual works. Prerequisite(s): MU101. Credits: 3
Involves various groups including symphony orchestra, contemporary ensemble, and other conducted organizations. Course content consists of appropriate musical repertoire, determined by ability level of students involved and the service requirements for departmental performance obligations. (This course serves to substitute for MU453 Musical Organization - Choral, for students concentrating in instrumental performance). Prerequisite(s): MU101. Credits: 6 (1.5 per semester)
Involves sight reading, transposing, and acquaintance with vocal and instrumental literature. Rehearsal and performance as accompanist for a required public performance of a full undergraduate recital. Analysis and practice in the vocal and instrumental repertoire; discussion of style and performance. Required practical training through two hours per week assigned accompaniment. Serves as Music Organization credit for juniors and seniors only. Prerequisite(s): MU101. Credits: 3
Introduces students with special interest in music theory to more advanced analytical methods and systems. Topics may include Post Tonal Theory, Schenkerian analysis and History of the Music Theory. Post Tonal Theory refers to atonal and 12 tone music with an emphasis in compositions by Schoenberg, Berg, Webern and Stravinsky. Schenkerian analysis provides a method for better apprehension of the compositional construction of tonal music. History of Music Theory is a survey of theoretical treatises and systems written from the Greek Antiquity until the Twentieth century. Prerequisite(s): MU203 Credits: 3

Senior Recital

In their senior year, Performance majors will give a recital, and Theory/Composition majors will organize a recital featuring their own compositions.

Recital in the major instrument in preparation with the instructor during the last semester of studies. Presentation of a half-recital of compositions written during residency for different media, with the student participating as performer or conductor of at least one work. Prerequisite(s): Completion of all music program requirements

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