Arts and Humanities

Select 1 course

Introduces students to the artistic experience and the world of art in a sophisticated way, providing
them with the language with which to discuss all types of art. Students explore different ideas, approaches and purposes of art. Students learn about the various forms of visual art and its historical classification, studying and viewing ancient art from all over the world and progressing through the significant movements in art through the ages. Prerequisites: None; Co-requisite: GE105. Credits: 3
Introduces students and assists them in developing their artistic potential. The class discusses problems in drawing, painting, and design using a variety of processes and material. The course also introduces students to digital design and exposes them to fundamental techniques and principles of Web pages and other popular sites. Students will learn how to analyze and criticize a Web design from a functional and aesthetic point of view, and how to develop a Web page with available software tools. Prerequisites: IT100. Credits: 3
Surveys the city of Athens from its ancient origins as a small village at the foot of the Acropolis, first settled in 4500 BC, to modern times, where it became the sprawling capital of Greece and home to four million people. Class meetings are organized chronologically and arranged so as to acquaint the student with significant historical events. The course will also explore the development of ideas and movements in art, philosophy, politics, religion, including their impact on society though the ages as well as their legacy in modern times. Prerequisites: GE105; Co-requisite: GE106. Credits: 3
Provides an introduction to the world of music and a survey of the history of Western classical music from the Middle Ages to the present. The course focuses on a select group of great compositions and composers with emphasis in the relationship between music and society. It also provides fundamental information on music theory. It is designed to be an enjoyable introduction to the world of classical music. A musical background or training is not assumed or required. Prerequisites: None; Co-requisite: GE105. Credits: 3
Introduces students to fundamental dramatic genres by exploring the works of key directors, practitioners and artistic  movements. Starting from Stanislavski and Brecht, the class will explore Dada, the Surrealists and the Theatre of the Absurd. As well as exploring the philosophy of each artistic movement, students will discuss and analyze selected texts in order to achieve a thorough understanding of both the theory and the practice of theater. The text analyses will be accompanied by some practical group work in the class. There is no need for prior acting experience. Prerequisites: None; Co-requisite: GE105. Credits: 3
Having been introduced to major dramatic movements, in this course students focus on the practical realization of important acting theories and methods. The class approaches texts-representatives from each dramatic genre and works in detail towards their presentation on stage. Students also investigate character work and explore exercises in relation to movement and voice. Prerequisites: None; Co-requisites: GE105, GE144. Credits: 3
Introduces students to the origins of theater. The course looks at the first instances of theater practice in ancient Greece, starting from the dithyramb, and how they developed into ancient Greek drama. It examines important works from the ancient Greek drama genre - both tragedy and comedy. In addition to discussing myth, the course also explores music, a very significant element of ancient Greek drama, and looks at works of opera and film that are based on Greek drama. Prerequisites: None; Co-requisite: GE105. Credits: 3
Presents the process of producing a play - from the first reading to its staging. Students explore  the roles of all the collaborators in a theatre production (director, actors, designer, composer etc.) and realize them in practice. Depending on the students' interests, the play to be approached will be either from the world repertory or a new work composed by  the students. The course will be completed with a performance presented by the students. Interested students are invited to have a short discussion/interview with the instructor before enrolling in the course. Prerequisites: None; Co-requisites: GE105, GE144. Credits: 3
Approaches the genre of musical heater in both analytical and creative terms. The course includes discussion of musical theater masterworks and analysis of their form and techniques. Students investigate the works’ sociological context, their content and the relationship between music, text and dance. The course will be completed with a performance/compilation of scenes from musicals studied in the term, arranged and presented by the students. Prerequisites: None; Co-requisite: GE105. Credits: 3
Familiarizes students with theories of aesthetics to better understand the arts. The course explores fundamental concepts such as beauty, appreciation and interpretation and analyzes them in the context of the dramatic arts. Students read works by theorists such as Kant, Nietzsche, and Schopenhauer in order to approach drama at a deeper level and investigate its relation to the other arts. Prerequisites: None; Co-requisite: GE105. Credits: 3
Students first meet with the instructor(s) to identify the central subject of the performance and then create a devised piece around this subject. The piece is then developed using a combination of several art  forms that are explored in a variety of spaces – from indoor theaters to sites around the city of Athens or even other cities in Greece, which students visit with their instructors. The students will get familiar with different artistic forms and work on their combination for the result of a new project. Collaboration is the main objective, which will now be developed outside the class in more demanding, yet more fascinating conditions. Prerequisites: None; Co-requisite: GE105. Credits: 3
Investigates the creative process through a series of interdisciplinary performance-oriented projects. Students work with the instructor(s) to find a focus for the project - the subject – which they then work collaboratively on developing. The primary matrix is site - specific  performance, but the project also embraces a wide variety of venues, from public performances in recognizable theater spaces, to related products such as texts, images & videos posted on the web, "micro-performances" (which may be as short as a minute) that may be staged or improvised, and gallery installation/performances. The course also draws on the study of art history, contemporary art & performance, site analysis, drawing & photography, videography, writing, web design, and ‘actor work’ (voice, movement, etc.) --as well as investigations into composition, design, color, light, use of 3D space and other nuts-and-bolts art work. The idea is to focus on process, to develop ideas in an organic way with the participants, to expand our sense of what performance is, and to expand the participants’ sense of themselves as artists. Prerequisites: None; Co-requisite: GE105. Credits: 3 
Provides students with the opportunity to explore certain core philosophical issues in the areas of epistemology (theory of knowledge), metaphysics (the theory of the nature of reality) and ethics (the theory of what we ought to do) at an introductory level. Among the problems examined are the following: can we know anything? If yes, what are the sources of knowledge? What is freedom and what is its relationship with moral responsibility? Are moral values objective? What is the relationship of morality with happiness? Students are encouraged to acquire a clear understanding of theories proposing answers to the above mentioned problems, but also to take a critical stance towards them and express their views in a clear and accurate way. The course can be useful for dealing with certain problems of professional/social/moral life which require the ability to  take decisions on the basis of careful assessment of arguments supporting different viewpoints. Therefore, it has inter-disciplinary relevance across the disciplines. Prerequisite: GE105. Credits: 3
Introduces the founding influences of Latin and Greek thinkers of antiquity, including writers such as Seneca and  Plutarch. The course incorporates the influences of European art and architecture and literature from the ancient world, Students trace Greco-Roman traditions and history as they gain an overview of key schools of thought that have carried over from antiquity. Prerequisites: GE105, GE106, GE112. Credits: 3
Explores the field of linguistics, and serves as a general introduction to the nature, history and use of human language, speech and writing, with a focus on English. During the semester, students will investigate the basic theories and methods of the different areas of linguistics, including phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics. Topics include the intricate rule systems that govern language, the similarities and differences among languages, and how spoken language relates to written language. Prerequisite(s): GE105; Co-requisite: GE106 Credits: 3
This course introduces students to the history and function of translation in society. Students learn the multiple ways in which translators work in multilingual and multicultural environments while they become  familiar with the main theoretical streams in Translation Studies. Students understand the importance of translation as an area of study and come to appreciate the age-old role translators have played as mediators between societies and cultures. Students gain hands-on translation practice by translating texts from English into Greek. Prerequisites: GE105, GE106; Co-requisite: ENG200. Credits: 3
Introduces students to Creative Writing in its most varied application, from writing for the media and the arts to experiments in the lyric essay, fiction and poetry; the attraction of this course is in its multi-genre and inter-disciplinary application. Students interested in journalism, script-writing, and creative non-fiction, will gain from this introduction as much as those interested in the beginnings of poetry and fiction writing. Readings will take place in the craft of the lyric, non-fiction essay, art reviews, script writing, story, and poetry. Students learn the basic strategies for writing in multiple, non-academic styles while focusing on the genre of their choice. Prerequisites: GE105, GE106, ENG220 (and by instructor's consent for non-BAELL students). Credits: 3
Introduces students to literature by providing a broad overview of the three major genres: the short story, poetry, and drama, with some exposure to critical theory; discusses the elements of fiction, poetry and drama, such the role of setting, character, plot, theme, style, imagery, symbolism, metaphors, and tone in fiction and poetry, and the differences between ancient Greek and Shakespearean theatre. Students are introduced to representative texts and the historical/cultural contexts that produced them. Prerequisites: GE105. Co-requisites: GE106. Credits: 3
Introduces students to a comparative approach to literature, gender theory and literary theory, by examining texts by women writers from different backgrounds, namely the UK, US, and Greece. Issues explored include: how (and if)  texts by women differ from texts by men, recurring themes in women's writing and the way these have changed through the course of the 20th century, and the ways writing challenges or reinforces existing cultural norms about gender. Writers whose work will be studied is determined by the instructor, these have included, but are not limited to: Virginia Woolf, Kate Chopin, Flannery O'Conner, Toni Morrison, Lilika Nakou, Margarita Lymberaki, Zyranna Zateli. Prerequisites: GE105, GE106, ENG220. Credits: 3
Explores the main aesthetic, political, and cultural questions that inform major works of the 19th and 20th centuries in both Modern Greek poetry and prose. It consists of selections and excerpts from the works of such authors as Kavafis, Katzankakis, Seferis, Elytis, Taktsis, Galanaki, etc. placed in their broader European literary landscape. Emphasis will be given on various aesthetic movements and sociopolitical issues such as nationalism, diaspora, immigration, gender, group and individual identity, relations between the center and the periphery, and globalization.
Prerequisites: GE105, GE106, ENG205, ENG220 Credits: 3
Surveys music chronologically from the Middle Ages to the present. Topics include chant and secular song in the middle ages, polyphonic music from its beginning through the thirteenth century, Arsnova, Renaissance music of the low countries, the music of reformation, music of the early baroque, Bach, Vivaldi, Haendel, Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Romantisicm, Opera from the early 20th century. Prerequisite for non-music majors: GE142. Credits: 3
Studies the most important fields of Greek Music from Classical Antiquity and Byzantine era to today’s traditional, classical and pop music. Topics include: Ancient Greek music, Music of the Hellenistic period. Music of the Byzantine Empire. Music during the Ottoman Empire, Greek folk music of the  mainland, Crete and the islands. Urban songs (Rembetika), Greek Classical Music from the Ionian islands, the Greek National School of music, contemporary classical music, pop, rock and other current streams. Prerequisites: None; For non-music majors: GE142. Credits: 3
Studies important issues connected with America's music: the art of improvisation; the role of composition; innovation and tradition; individuality and style; instruments and forms. Examination of the formation of the roots of American music, and issues of race. Students will learn how to appreciate Native American music, Delta blues, country, New Orleans jazz, New York swing and bebop, Classical American music and pop if they are unfamiliar with it, and to deepen their understanding. Prerequisites: None; For non-music majors: GE142 Credits: 3
This course examines different approaches to word-music relationships in a broad range of periods and genres. Combining text (whether sung or implied) and music adds another layer to both elements reinforcing meaning and feeling. Students will explore some of these rich interactions in such diverse and chronologically disparate genres as the troubadour song, the Renaissance erotic madrigal, the German Lied, the program symphony, as well as modern combinations of words and music. We will consider how the elements of the text (syntax, rhyme, form, alliterations, etc.) dictate particular musical decisions, but also how the music underlines, attenuates, or even subverts the meaning of the words. Concepts to investigate include irony, musical rhetoric, intertextuality, and, even, “silence.” Prerequisites: MU142 for non music majors. Credits: 3

Log in